Ash Kitchen Cabinets

Ash Kitchen Cabinets

Oak is the most common wood used for solid wood cabinets. Because of the strong “flower” grain in the wood, oak looks best in country settings. You can stain it almost any color, and since the graining is so strong, the grain will always come through the stain. To offset the reddish coloring, use either white oak, which is lighter in its natural coloring, or, if you prefer red oak, go “browner” in the stain selection. A cherry stain enriches the color of red oak. Cherry, used primarily in formal cabinets with raised panels, either French or English style, is an ele­gant wood with a natural reddish coloring that is much deeper than oak. Rift oak is a veneer much sought after by architects and designers. The oak flower is cut away, leaving the vertical grain. White oak is used for rift selection, so that it becomes very light when stained. This type of oak would generally be used in flush overlay con­struction, in which no frames would be visible. Hickory, another wood used in country settings, is a strong brown wood with natural markings. Birch has a very white, natural coloring. It takes a stain well and is often used in contemporary cabinets as well as in raised and recessed panel doors. Ash is the whitest wood and often employed in cab­inet interiors. It has very little graining or flower and takes a stain well in addition to easily accepting enamel or lacquer paint. Pine, which has a yellowish cast, takes distressing and antiquing beautifully, one reason it is so often used in English, French, and American country set­tings. Its drawback is that it is a soft wood and can be nicked easily. Maple is a hard wood that some manufacturers use primarily as a base for enamel or stains. It has little graining and tends to appear yellow. More exotic woods, such as wormy chestnut, which is highly distressed, and cypress, which has a yellow cast, are primarily available regionally and are not offered by most kitchen cabinet manufacturers. Those who know best about how to work with these woods are specialty wood workers. To find a cabinet shop in your area, visit NKBA.org/ProSearch. In ordering wood kitchen cabinets, try to see a sample of currently produced work to check the colors. Samples can oxidize over time so you’ll want to see how the fresh stains appear. Solid Wood Inside and Out? Note that many stores will promote their kitchen cabinets as made of “wood,” yet a single cabinet box can be made up of a wide range of products and veneers. Even in higher-quality kitchen cabinets, solid wood may be used only for doors and frames. A kitchen cabinet made entirely of solid wood may not even be your best bet, particularly if you live in a high-humidity area. Wood reacts to humidity, or the lack of it, and to temperature changes in the environ­ment. As a result, you can expect some shrinking or warping over time. On the other hand, a solid wood kitchen cabinet looks, feels, and smells like “quality” and exudes a sense of warmth that can’t be matched by composite and synthetic materials. The best-quality cabinets match the wood grains of their faces and boxes.
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Ash Kitchen Cabinets

​ This kitchen cabinet is designed by a well-known Italy designer, showing simple and elegant style. Bright color, clear ash wood grain, can make you feel cozy and pleasure, like walking in the forest. Movable countertop with door on the island adds highlight for the kitchen cabinet. The beauty, the worthwhile and the valuable of solid wood from a past age live on and are carried over to today. And it has a long lifespan and can refinished and repaired over the years. Resists heat, water, bacteria and stains; Most durable option, resists scratches; Nonporous; Easy cleaning; Melamine have affordability, attractiveness and durability. It is now available in a variety of finishes, colors and styles.
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Ash Kitchen Cabinets

This kitchen cabinet is designed by a well-known Italy designer, showing simple and elegant style. Bright color, clear ash wood grain, can make you feel cozy and pleasure, like walking in the forest. Movable countertop with door on the island adds highlight for the kitchen cabinet.
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Ash Kitchen Cabinets

Step One // Pro Secrets for Painting Kitchen Cabinets Prep the Room Photo by Brian Wilder (inset) Before starting a kitchen paint job, empty the cabinets, clear off the counters, and remove freestanding appliances. Relocate tables and other furniture to another room. Tape rosin paper over the countertops and flooring, and tape plastic sheeting over the backsplash, windows, fixed appliances, and interior doorways (to protect the rest of the house from dust and fumes). Mask off the wall around the cabinets. Finally, set up a worktable for painting doors, drawers, and shelves. Pro Tip: In kitchens the key to a good paint job is surface prep. “Old cabinets are covered with everything from hand oils to greasy smoke residue to petrified gravy,” says Dee. “You’ve got to get all that off or the paint won’t stick.”
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Ash Kitchen Cabinets

Slow-drying, oil-based primers work fine on tight-grained woods like maple or cherry, or on man-made materials. But they just sink into open-grained woods such as oak, ash, mahogany, or hickory. Brushing putty, the pudding-thick, oil-based coating Dee used on these oak cabinets, fills the grain as it primes the wood. A couple of caveats: It should be applied with a good-quality nylon-polyester brush, which you’ll have to throw away after each coat. And it doesn’t become level as it dries; assiduous sanding is required to flatten it out.
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Ash Kitchen Cabinets

Step Twelve // Pro Secrets for Painting Kitchen Cabinets Hang Cabinets to Dry Between Coats Photo by Brian Wilder Painting cabinet doors is a trade-off between perfection and speed. John Dee, a perfectionist, prefers to do one side at a time, keeping the faces flat so they don’t get runs. But that’s 48 hours of drying time per door—one day per side. Here’s his method for painting both sides in a day. Twist two screw hooks into holes drilled in an inconspicuous door edge (the lower edge for bottom cabinets, the upper edge for top cabinets). Paint the door’s outside face as above. Let it dry for an hour while resting flat, then tilt the door up onto its hooks and put a drywall screw into an existing hardware hole. Hold the tilted door up by the screw and paint the door’s back side. When you’re done painting, pick up the door by the screw and one hook and hang both hooks on a sturdy wire clothes hanger. Suspend from a shower curtain rod or clothes rod until the door is dry.
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Ash Kitchen Cabinets

Birch Birch is a durable, fine-grain wood that is slightly darker than maple. It takes finishes well and can masquerade as a more expensive wood. When stained, it can achieve a good “faux” cherry or maple look. Prone to some irregular coloring, birch is a relatively inexpensive wood choice in both stock and semicustom lines.Ash is similar in strength and durability to oak, but has a light color and a more pronounced figure. This straight-grain lumber takes on a contemporary character when it’s given a clear or natural finish. Its availability is limited in semicustom lines and is more often seen in custom work.
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Ash Kitchen Cabinets

If your kitchen cabinets are solid but dated and dark, a fresh coat of paint can go a long way toward transforming the space without draining your bank account. You can hire a pro to spray-paint them for a thousand dollars or more, but there’s a less costly, and less messy, alternative to consider: Use a brush and paint the cabinets yourself. “You don’t need to spray to get a smooth finish,” says painting contractor John Dee, who has worked on a number of This Old House TV projects. He often brush-paints cabinets anyway because it gives him more control and avoids the risk of paint spray ending up where it’s not wanted. (Surface prep is the same whether you spray or brush.) Brushing is time-consuming, he warns, and could take up to a couple of weeks to complete. But the result is a durable, glass-smooth finish that’s the equal of anything from a spray gun. “You just need to use the best materials and take the time to sand and do the brushwork right,” Dee says.
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Before starting a kitchen paint job, empty the cabinets, clear off the counters, and remove freestanding appliances. Relocate tables and other furniture to another room. Tape rosin paper over the countertops and flooring, and tape plastic sheeting over the backsplash, windows, fixed appliances, and interior doorways (to protect the rest of the house from dust and fumes). Mask off the wall around the cabinets. Finally, set up a worktable for painting doors, drawers, and shelves. Pro Tip: In kitchens the key to a good paint job is surface prep. “Old cabinets are covered with everything from hand oils to greasy smoke residue to petrified gravy,” says Dee. “You’ve got to get all that off or the paint won’t stick.”