Sugar Glider Kitchen

Sugar Glider Kitchen

Ok, now having said that, let’s wrap up this article by quickly covering what are probably the TWO most common ways that a Sugar bear can die around the house, and how you can easily keep this from happening to YOUR new babies… The first thing to watch for are TOILETS – because an open toilet lid, combined with an inquisitive little Sugar glider, is pretty much a formula for disaster. Now, obviously the danger here is drowning. Once your Sugar bears start to get older and you start giving them a little more freedom, eventually they will find the bathroom. Then, if the toilet lid is open and they fall in, the porcelain is so smooth that they can’t pull themselves out and they’ll drown almost immediately. Luckily, this is a VERY easy problem to avoid, because all you have to do is make sure and put all the toilet lids down before you take your Sugar bear out, and the problem is pretty much solved. We’ve found that for those who like to be extra sure, on top of keeping the toilet lids down it’s also a good idea to just keep the bathroom doors closed too, and that way you can totally avoid ANY problems.
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Sugar Glider Kitchen

I’ve used glider diners in the past. My girls shared one nicely, even though it was small. Sometimes I used two anyway. When I homed Ollie, he also had glider diners, so I used them with him as well. He was in a mesh enclosure, and glider diners are pretty necessary in those, although I really grew to hate them. The current travel cage is a mesh enclosure, and I have yet to settle on a way to get around using them. In their home cage, I do not use them. I place one feeding f/v station as high in the cage as possible and elevated to help prevent contamination. And I place another f/v feeding station on the floor of the cage, placed under something to help prevent contamination. I do not mind cleaning food pieces off surfaces and cage pan. I clean the cage pan daily anyway. I use liners, one on the feeding shelf high up in cage, and one as a place mat on the floor. Upper right shelf is one feeding station Floor feeding station under hammock
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Sugar Glider Kitchen

About the only other factor to consider when deciding where to put your Sugar glider’s cage is noise. Keep in mind that Sugar bears are instinctively nocturnal animals, and while they themselves don’t really make much noise (other than occasionally barking), they DO usually like to be up at night playing and jumping around in their cage. Now, how much noise they end up making largely depends on what kind of toys you put in their cage with them, and obviously things like bells and squeaky toys will obviously make some noise. The bottom line is that you can pretty much control the noise level at night largely by just picking out which toys are in their cage, and if their cage is located out in the kitchen or living room anyway, you probably won’t even hear it. There is one more important issue to consider while we’re on this topic, and that is about HOW MUCH you should let your new baby run around in your house.
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Sugar Glider Kitchen

Now, when it comes to cages, this is ONE area where it is especially important to be very careful. Many people out there who sell Sugar bears will tell you that almost any kind of cage, including bird cages, will work just fine for Sugar bears. This is NOT, REPEAT, NOT true, for BABY Sugar bears. Here’s why… First, if you look at the cage that came with your baby Sugar bear, you will notice that the wire has a special coating on it, and that the holes in the cage are actually one by a one-half inch rectangles – NOT bars. Now, this does make our cages a little more expensive than others, but we do this for a very specific reason.
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If you take a good look at your new baby Sugar glider’s hands and feet, you will notice that they are incredibly CUTE, with little fingers, toes, and even THUMBS. However, when they are babies, their feet & hands are also fairly delicate, and when they’re in their cage, they really like to jump around a lot and cling to the sides and top of the cage like little acrobats. The problem with most other animal cages (especially bird cages), is that they are primarily made up of BARS that run up and down vertically, and therefore have very few horizontal bars. For an active baby Sugar bear, this can be a BIG problem, because when they instinctively jump from side to side, they have to REALLY squeeze these vertical bars to hold on and keep from sliding down. Because their hands are SO small and SO delicate, this can sometimes lead to cuts and tears in their little paws.
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It’s been a wee bit quiet here on this site. For that I apologize. But I’ve been baking up something fabulous. I’ve been converting my commercial baking space in Vermont into a classroom. I have loved teaching at King Arthur Flour enormously (I’ll continue teaching my classes there and at other venues across the country) but I don’t get to do it as often as students, or I, would like. Enter: Sugar Glider Kitchen. Go check it out to see what the experience is all about. I’m offering small classes of up to 12 people in all things baking. The first classes start on the week of February 22nd, my mom’s birthday. I couldn’t think of a better time to start the venture. To go straight to the class schedules, click HERE. You’ll find everything from macaron to croissant classes but I’m also offering classes for beginners as well. Starting in April, I’ll offer a Baking 101 class at the top of the month. I’m also offering private classes for parties of 8-12 students. Email sugargliderkitchen@gmail.com or fill out the contact from on www.sugargliderkitchen.com to set up your private class. Macaron Class
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Sugar Glider Kitchen is a baking school run by pastry chef and baking instructor, Gesine Bullock-Prado. Located in Hartford, Vermont in the converted carriage house of a historic tavern, we offer intimate classes of 8-12 bakers.
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What she loves, more than anything, is to teach all that she knows and loves about baking. When you book a class at Sugar Glider Kitchen, you’ll enjoy a hands on baking class like no other. You’ll leave the studio armed with knowledge and inspiration. It’s a sweet guarantee
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I perform a trick when I teach pies at my little baking school, Sugar Glider Kitchen. I do it after the class has made the perfect pie crust and I’ve left their future flaky perfection to chill in my bakery refrigerator. I roll out my dough and start cutting it into strips. I weave the dough together, stopping now and again when a student needs to see the pattern again. Once the pattern is set, I execute a slight of hand. Voila. A perfect lattice sitting upon a jewel toned pile of berries in a blind baked bottom crust as if by magic. There have been gasps in the past when I’ve done it. It’s the pastry version of whipping a tablecloth from a beautifully set dining scene with nary a bobble. Perhaps not so dramatic but certainly more delicious. None of this trickery matters, however, if once you bake the pie it isn’t delicious. That’s why the first part of my Perfect Pie class I take the time to explain, demonstrate, and encourage my students to get their hands dirty so that they can experience what a great pie dough feels like because it’s never “easy as pie,” is it? For some, pie dough is a baking albatross. It comes out tough or crumbly. Soggy or dry. Students have come to me, shame-faced, and admitted that they buy their pie crusts because it’s too painful to take the time to make it from scratch and have it all go wrong. Easy to ignore a camera in the face when I’m making a lattice. I take the time to explain that a great dough doesn’t necessarily behave like you think it should. Not at the beginning, anyway. It won’t look perfect and smooth. In fact, it often looks a little dry and what I call “shaggy.” “Squeeze it,” I encourage. I take it between my fingers to demonstrate. Students, hard at work, making croissant. “If it holds together when you squeeze it, you’re good. No more water.” The reactions vary from disbelief to incredulity. That mess I’m calling pie dough cannot be, in fact, pie dough. But it is. And it’s a great pie dough. Flaky and tender. Don’t get me wrong. There are a few steps you have to take to transform the mess from shaggy to perfect but walking students through the process is my favorite part of the job. Better than executing the perfect lattice, in fact. But why not learn to do both? I’ll teach you how. In fact, I’ll teach you how to make croissant and eclair and all manner of wonderful baked goodness. I’ll be here waiting for you in Vermont when you’re ready.